Patience

My mother used to tell me that she always knew I would be in a hurry for the rest of my life. She laughingly said that if the doctor had not been standing where he was when I was born, I would’ve been splattered against the far wall. I was in a hurry to be born. She said her labour lasted minutes. That explains so much about my personality.  Patience is a virtue with which I’m only slightly familiar.  But I’m working on it.

We live in a fast pace world where everything appears to be done in second gear, at least.  News is instantaneous and we barely have a moment to process before we’re onto the next big thing. Highways are filled with people rushing to get to work, rushing to get to their shopping, in a hurry to get to the baseball game. Always in a hurry. What do we need patience for? Well, it seems to me like we’re always being told to hurry up and get in line just to wait. And to wait.

When I was a child, I was impatient with everything. I wanted to be older, taller, wiser. And I didn’t like waiting for it to happen naturally. Well since nature will not be coerced, I got there eventually. Now that I am significantly farther down the natural life line, I look back with amusement. And I have a different understanding of patience.

The physical world will always move at its own pace. People require things to be done on their timelines and the world will wait for no one. But inside, in the recesses of your mind, is where real patience is important. That is where we truly have control, where we can be the directors of our own conscience.

I think the people I admire the most are the ones who are able to live in both worlds. The fast-paced physical world and the more calming cerebral one. These are the people who can process and understand the breakneck speed in which we live and are capable of responding appropriately. We need leaders who are capable of this while still holding onto compassion and integrity. Heady stuff. But isn’t that what life is all about? We should face the unknown with anticipation and with confidence. I’m always curious to see what the next page has to say.

Of course, I also have no problem sitting back and relaxing with a good book and letting the world move on without me.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

49 thoughts on “Patience

  1. Murphy’s Law

    Patience is a virtue that sadly some folks are unaware of. I think I’m a reasonably patient person, but that’s just my opinion! Some situations make it difficult to be patient. I think too that we often mistake “anxious” for “impatient”.

    People seem to be in such a hurry to get nowhere fast. I agree, we definitely need leaders who can see more than one side to every situation and respond with a calm, level head.

    I think patience comes with maturity, and some of us never seem to mature. We just get older. Big difference!

    Wonderful post Pam. You are so good at giving us something to think about!

    Love your painting. Now that took patience!
    Ginger

    Liked by 4 people

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    1. quiall Post author

      Thank you my friend. I’m not sure I want to admit to being mature. I don’t know that I’m ready. And thank you for your comment on the painting. If I’m telling truth, that painting took not much time and little thought. That seems to be the way I paint most times. Some of my paintings have been done in 20 minutes.

      Liked by 1 person

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  2. joylennick

    Well said, Pamela! I too was always racing around: to Infants school by foot: up steep hills in Wales (evacuation); to work; to different schools with three sons – puff puff. ‘Running a shop, and later a small, hotel…Now I’m retired…at last I can take it easy! Cheers. xx

    Liked by 2 people

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  3. K.L. Hale

    Pam, I always enjoy reading your truths. I’ve been described as one of the most patient people. I mention that it wasn’t always that way…like you, with time, it can develop in circumstances in which we literally confess cannot change regardless of how fast and perfect we desire it. My devotion this morning was about foundation. After losing all that seemed to be the desires of my life, I realized none of it mattered. Last Thursday I almost left the hospital when told my medicine (nuclear radiation) wouldn’t arrive for 4 more hours (I was fighting another infection too and it made me a bit irritable). I had just completed 5 days of external radiation and had to find friends to drive me each day. God, please give me patience. It pays off!! I’m able to stop my brain, harness my heart, and think of those who suffer way worse than me! We’re all walking this journey together and I must continue to be patient. Thank you for writing about your journey with patience. It hits us all in our unique places. You’re a beautiful artist and human my friend! 💛

    Liked by 3 people

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    1. quiall Post author

      I cannot begin to conceive of what you were dealing with. I don’t know that I would have the strength. You are handling it with grace and conviction. Kudos to you. You stand as beacon of hope for others.

      Liked by 2 people

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      1. K.L. Hale

        Oh, Pam,…your words are precious. Thank you. I hope everyone can find hope. It’s so dark without it. Your post was so timely for me. Thank you for being an inspiration to me in how you live too. 💛

        Liked by 2 people

    2. Murphy’s Law

      Karla, I am thinking about you. I know you were set up for outpatient external radiation and I believe Oct. 4th is your celiac injection. Because, you know, a girl can’t have too much fun! 🤗

      I imagine you’re more than a little worn out so I hope you’re able to rest between appointments. Miss your posts, but first things first, and that’s rebuilding your strength.

      My prayers, love and positive thoughts are still with you.

      So glad to see you here today!

      Hang in. Hang on. But no hangovers allowed! 😵‍💫
      Ginger

      Liked by 3 people

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      1. K.L. Hale

        Thank you, Ginger, for the giggles and kind words. I really know how to have fun! Yes, Tuesday they will put me “under” and use endoscopy to numb nerves going to pancreas (I asked if they could remove the tumors on the lymph nodes while they were there…no luck! My sons and families will be with me soon and that’s all the medicine I need~one day of that lasts a long time! I felt bad for not reading how everyone was doing and so thankful I felt well enough to jump on here and heed wise words from my friends and family! I’m hanging in and on! 💛

        Liked by 2 people

    3. Mark Lanesbury

      These guys said it all Karla (beautiful aren’t they!), so I’ll just throw lots of love and energy and a great big hug for this part of your journey. It does test us in so many ways but as hard as it is, it does make us something wonderful. So, without further ado, I send you an energetic image of laying on a sun chair at the beach sipping your favorite drink with Finley and friends, at rest while this time goes by 😀❤️🙏🏽

      Liked by 2 people

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  4. Dale

    It’s funny… I was almost three weeks late. Yet once I was “free”, I never slowed down (according to my mother) wanting to be a part of everything and not miss out. While I still don’t want to miss out, I am no longer in quite the same rush to get anywhere. Patience came with my first born because I had no choice. I was forced to wait, for him, for pretty much everything. It gave me a new perspective. I no longer get all frazzled because I have to wait in any line. If it’s out of my control, then I don’t worry about it. Doesn’t mean I don’t fret about other things (sometimes uselessly) but I am a work in progress.
    Happy Sunday!

    Liked by 1 person

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    1. quiall Post author

      It is nice to know that we are both a work in progress! As long as we are progressing, we are good. It’s amazing the lessons we can learn from our children. Even if we don’t actually bear them.

      Liked by 1 person

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  5. John Hric

    Well written Pam. And you did well to quote your mother and mention the proverbial wall. Life is a series of adjustments and one of those is to indeed come to understand and avoid the wall. Repeat blood donors know that giving 100% is not an option. And large scale public demonstrations by certain amply rewarded individuals have sadly shown that patience is more than a virtue it is often a necessity. When the scientists say now is not the time to launch it means wait. Alter the schedule and wait. Geomagnetic storms and low earth orbit satellites do not mix. 40 of 49 Starlink satellites failed to orbit and cost the company and investors 100 million dollars. And thus is the definition of the word hubris refreshed. Beware of walls even fluctuating atmospheric ones… they will bring you down.

    Liked by 1 person

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  6. Linda Pearce Griffin

    I can relate to the impatience of your youth – when I wanted to be grown up, taller, wiser, better – and NOW! And there are days when I am impatient even now. However, age and some wisdom has afforded me a more relaxed outlook these days and I am grateful for my slower pace. I love the quip: “Lord, grant me patience – now.” 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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  7. joylennick

    Having dealt early with the ‘unmentionable’ C in 1969 and survived and seen my dear husband survive it many years later, cancer, and other sufferers have my greatest respect. We were very fortunate, but you, Karla, seem to be having a gruelling time of it, so am wishing and hoping as strongly as I’m able, that you will emerge completely cured. Hope is a powerful, wonderful emotion, so dig deep. Love Joy xx

    Liked by 1 person

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