Tag Archives: differences

I Didn’t Break The 50s!

 

Technically, I was child of the 50s.  Well at least for six months. With wild abandon I guzzled homemade milk and had a bevy of staff to cater to my every need. It was paradise.

In reality, I was a child of the 60s. I do recall watching the moon landing on a black-and-white TV. We only had three stations to watch and you had to get up to change the channel. There were no cell phones or colour TVs.  The Internet hadn’t been invented. I was a kid. I went outside and played. I scraped my knees and probably bloodied my nose a few times. We could breathe the air deeply and not worry about coughing up a lung. Most recollections are idyllic.

But the 60s was also a time of war, poverty, assassinations, racism and sickness. The history books remember the bad stuff. People try not to. It was a time of Family and single incomes. Roles were expected for men and women and children. It was only in those progressive families that young girls were allowed to dream without restrictions. I didn’t know there were restrictions. But then I didn’t know what to dream.

Times were different in the past. There was good and bad. But we evolved. That sounds like a step forward but it too comes with both good and bad. We eradicated some diseases and then created new ones. We got smart and creative in how to deal with illnesses, viruses, so they too evolved.  Now we have superbugs and inefficient medicines. Nowadays we love our children to dream without restrictions but then we stress them out with the requirements to succeed. A double-edged sword.

I am in an unrepentant optimist. I believe we will solve the problems we created. Am I naïve? Perhaps. But I look around this world and I see our children recognizing the problems and standing up. They are shaming the past and working hard towards fixing the future. Will they succeed? I hope so. I doubt I’ll be around to see everything fixed. I believe we are moving in the right direction. But this is not something that can only be on the shoulders of the children. We all need to be involved. Even if it’s only in a small way. The very least we can do is support them.

Our world is a paradise. There is incredible beauty here but we must be prepared to look and to see.  We must also be prepared to defend that paradise. We only have one world and we are all in this together. It isn’t about one group, one culture, one faction. It is all of us!

 

Defying Gravity

In the interest of full disclosure, I am admitting that I’m about to go on a bit of a rant. Some of the things I say may offend a few and for that I apologize. I don’t apologize for what I’m about to impart. I think it’s high time something was said. I am quite sure I’m not the only one who has had these thoughts. It is not said with any malice but plenty of forethought.

I recently watched part of the Emmy awards program. I was surprised at how few shows I had actually seen. And I do watch TV. I think a great many of them were actually on Crave or Netflix or some other alternative to regular television.  I enjoy watching actors that I admire. There was also a touching bit about individuals, in that business, that we have lost. There were a few I didn’t know about.

Award shows have always been a magnet for people to talk about fashion. In particular, the media loves to focus on what the women are wearing. I saw a few men in comment worthy outfits but they are not the focus of my rant.

Women have fought long and hard to be worthy of accolades. There was a time when women were less important than the livestock they cared for. They have worked hard to be seen as equal to men, to be equal to men. We talk about the glass ceiling and how we are consistently breaking it. Women want to be appreciated for what they are capable of, not how they look. Or so I thought.  And then you go to an awards show. And those dresses, in many cases, defy gravity! If you don’t want to be seen as a beautiful object, then why do you dress as one? We don’t talk about men suits and what a beautiful cut they have. We talk about women’s dresses and how good/ awful/ bizarre they might be.

 

“ I can’t move or breathe or walk, But it’s great!”

 

A celebrity actually said that! Women are taped, plucked and wrapped up so they look extraordinary. It is an awful lot of work. But perhaps it is appropriate for a business that is all about the illusion. And the theme of the night seemed to be ‘breasts’.  Specifically: how little can you cover and still be considered decent.  A whole lot of taped died in pursuit of an award that night.

I am quite sure that Monday morning the call once again became ‘women should not be objectified’, unless of course it is by themselves.

 

Rant completed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There Once Was a Girl Named Amiss . . .

 

There once was a girl named Amiss,

Who’s goal in her life was to kiss.

With men she would meet,

Their faces she’d greet,

And nary a one did dismiss!

 

The boys from around got to know,

From Amiss they’d get quite a show.

They’d come from afar,

To see the new star,

Only to find she’s a miss!

 

Now time as you know won’t be harried.

But the message of course will be carried.

From the men she did meet,

There was one she did keep,

And now the miss is a married!