Tag Archives: differences

Flotsam and Jetsam

 

Flotsam and Jetsam

Adrift on the sea

Some is deliberate

Others carefree.

 

Riding the currents

No motor or sail

Hoping for fair winds

And that peace will prevail.

 

We ride the waves

The seas are our world

For we are the Jetsam

And Flotsam unfurled.

 

Peace is the goal

As each wave hits its peak

Wonders appear

It is of this that we speak.

 

Together we soar

Or together we drown

Each brother and sister

Will never back down.

 

The future is bright

If we make a pact

Here in this moment

We just have to act!

 

 

Efficiency

 

I was in my kitchen the other day stirring together two powders to make my version of chai latte. I take a powdered chai and a powdered white-hot chocolate and mixed them together. It’s a little less spicy than regular chai and a little less sweet then white-hot chocolate. It takes a little time, stirring to make the combination right.  But in the end:  a perfect morning cuppa!

As I was mindlessly stirring the two powders together, my brain drifted to the question of efficiency. For a brief second I wondered if there was a more efficient way of mixing these two. And then I was horrified!  We endeavor to make our lives easier by inventing devices to do the mundane deeds. Like mixing together two powders. And then I stopped. If I had a device do the work for me, I would never have had the time to think about just how inefficient efficiency is.

Perhaps I should explain. Efficiency comes from being efficient. The definition of efficient is:  achieving maximum productivity with minimum wasted effort or expense or working in a well-organized and competent way or preventing the wasteful use of a particular resource. You must love Google search.

Maximum productivity. That sounds good. Well organized, a minimum effort, competent and my favourite:  preventing the wasteful use of a particular resource. What about us? All the tools we create to make our lives easier actually prevent us from actually ‘doing’. We sit in our armchairs and direct from a distance but we don’t get our hands dirty. I think a little dirt is called for. How else are we going to learn?

Ask anyone who creates just how that feels. Ask a woodworker, an artist, a chef. They take of themselves and create. Machines can’t! Or at least not yet. We need machines to assist us as tools. That is a given and I accept that. What I do not accept is people giving up control. We defer to whatever our phone happens to say but we never think to wonder if we have asked the right question.

I used to bake bread. It was a long drawn out process, I had to get my hands dirty. And I loved it! I would follow the recipe to a certain point and then I would become creative. A bread maker can’t do that. Only human hands can. Machines follow directions given to them by human beings. Machines build cars nowadays because they’re more efficient then people. But they’re not perfect. Ask anyone who drives a car that stops when it rains. Machines can’t find the problem and fix it, only people can. So why do we continually bow to the machines that we created to make our lives easier?

Do we use the time we supposedly gain from using machines to better ourselves or our environment? No. We’ll use that time to work harder so that we can afford to buy machines to make our life easier so that we can work harder so that we can . . . It’s a vicious cycle.

Machines are tools that we should never give up control to. Let’s not lose our ability to think. It’s one of the few things we have left.

 

Animal Crime?

 

Discriminately speaking,

Said the possum from bed,

There’s a fly on the wall

And I think that’s he’s dead!

 

How can I sleep

Surrounded by crime?

Murder and mayhem

Time after time!

 

There’s much to be done

To save all our lives.

But first clean the wall

It’s giving me hives.

 

Doctor, oh Doctor

Have you got a cure?

Things are not right

Of this I am sure!

 

There’s a wolf at my door

And he wants to get in!

He wants me for dinner,

And his cooking’s a sin.

 

Now the rabbits are fine

Not a hair out of place.

Which makes me suspicious

I think there’s a case.

 

Fraud and deceit,

They play all the time.

I don’t trust the cuteness

I think it’s a crime.

 

How weary my soul

With this evil about.

I’ll go back to sleep

And cover my snout!

 

 

 

 

Here’s the thing . . .

Time.  We never seem to have enough of it. It’s always getting in the way. We have passed it, try to keep it or even wished it away. Some days it seems to control everything we do. Time. We invented it and like Frankenstein’s monster, it is wrecking havoc!

The Egyptians were the first to start dividing the day into segments. They were not the only ones.  The ancient Greeks, the Chinese, Tibet, Japan, England and many others all had a hand in creating the concept we call Time. The first devices to follow it were created as early as 2000 BC. And we still can’t seem to get it right!

We have fine-tuned the concept even more and we now divide the day into ridiculously small components. Milliseconds, seconds, minutes, hours, . . .  and almost everyone seems to be attached to a device that follows those seconds and even vocally informs us of how much we have left. People are obsessed with it. When I went looking into this idea for my post, I found almost 10,000 quotes related to time. Some were funny, some could inspire you, some are even considered wise old saying. The Internet is a wonderful place to fine lists of things . . .

“Time waits for no one.” Folklore

“Lost time is never found again.” Benjamin Franklin

“Time brings all things to pass.” Aeschylus

“If you love life, don’t waste time, for time is what life is made up of.”  Bruce Lee

“A man who dares to waste one hour of time has not discovered the value of life.” Charles Darwin

Definitely a popular topic. And so it should be!  86,400 seconds. That’s it. One day. 86,400 seconds. Some of that is spent sleeping, eating, the other thing we do because we eat, that we don’t talk about. But how much of that time do we spent in contemplation? How much of that time do we spend acknowledging the miracle that is life? I know, I know, most people don’t want to think about it. But our time here is finite. Nobody gets out alive. We need to be aware, to notice the beauty, be inspired by that which is all around us. We use Time to control our lives but it also helps us to focus on what that life actually is. Once the time is gone, it is past and cannot be relived. As long as we can remember our past, it will never die and that moment in time can be preserved. But perhaps we should notice first and preserve second. Time can be your friend but never forget it’s only a label.

Context

 

As many of you know I love to listen in on other peoples’ conversations.  No, I don’t mean that I stalk individuals and listen illegally into their discussions. But I have been known to trail after an interesting couple simply to hear the rest of what they are saying. But allow me to give it some context. If you hear someone speaking about murdering another, you really want to know more.

We live in a society where everyone seems to have a mobile phone connected to their ear lobe. I cannot count the number of times I have been forced to speak up before a person runs into me simply because they’re paying attention to their phone and not what was in front of them. Ah, the joys of technology!

We can’t know exactly what someone else is talking about on the phone or in a text. We don’t know what that individual is dealing with. Is the text to a girlfriend/boyfriend explaining that they are pregnant, accepted into that prestigious law firm or asking for them to bring home milk?

We live in a society of tidbits. We hear snippets of a conversation walking down the street, often more than one. We are jostled by someone trying to get into the store and for a micro second we share a look. What is that person dealing with? Are they happy, sad, frustrated, suicidal, manic, murderous? We don’t know. And yet we often make judgments based on a split-second interaction. Tidbits.

No one seems to know the whole story about anything. The Media included. Politicians tell us what they think we want to hear.  Is there any truth in what they have to say? Possibly. Friends speak from the heart and sometimes tell you what you need to hear. But often they tell you what they believe will make you feel better.  What is the truth? And is the truth something that needs to be relayed all the time? I don’t think so. Let me give you a little context. A friend had convinced me to go to a new hairdresser. She was a Stylist from New York!   She had a very heady reputation and they could fit me in. I think I was supposed to be honored. When I entered her very luxurious salon I was asked if I wanted a Perrier. I did not. She then spent 15 minutes talking to me. She told me she wanted to know what kind of person I was so that she could give me the haircut I needed.  She spent quite a bit of time whipping my hair into… something? After I had forked over the national debt for a small country, I left. I don’t think she was terribly impressed with me. We didn’t speak.

I have never been to New York. I hear is a “happening” city.  Food, Fashion, Finance. The Holy F’s?  Perhaps the haircut I received was considered fashionable in the mecca that is considered Manhattan.  I don’t live in New York. I explained I was quite conservative and liked the simple things. My hair looked like it had been cut by an eight-year-old high on cocaine with dull scissors and a tick.  I wish I was kidding. My sister was getting married in a week. There would be pictures.

I went back to my regular hairdresser and pleaded with him to fix it. It became really short. Oh, and that very fashionable New York hairstylist? She moved on to more appropriate grounds.  Lesson learned. Context.